Pressure Point ApplicationThis is a featured page

Pressure Point ApplicationPressure point techniques have been incorporated into the advanced defensive tactics syllabus as a low-level force option in the use of force continuum. These techniques create options that allow the Operator to adapt for the changing situation Security Personnel are placed into. They are used to assist in controlling an aggressive subject and without the knowledge of pressure points; striking and kicking techniques have no purpose other then being blind movements that can cause potential harm to the subject.

Pressure points are separated into two categories
Nerve pressure points
Nerve pressure points can be described as those pressure points, which are located on the head, neck and used to control passive or defensive resistance through pain compliance.

Nerve motor points
They are 3 – 5 inches in diameter and are located in the large muscle mass in the shoulders, arms, and legs and used to interrupt the body’s motor functions and generally cause a stun, which can last for three and to seven seconds. Nerve motor points are sensitive to specific types of strikes, which can result in motor dysfunction. The strikes are normally delivered in three styles – snapping, cutting and fluid shock wave.

Methods of ApplicationThere are three methods of application each with individual attributes for varying effects, touch pressure, quick penetration and striking (Fluid shock wave).

Touch pressure
Application designed to create pain compliance by using digital pressure and coordination with verbal instructions. Touch pressure is used to maintain low-level resistance, for example passive or defensive resistance. The following steps should be adhered to when applying pressure to nerve pressure points:
- Stabilise the head
- Apply pressure / counter pressure
- Give loud and clear instructions
- Reduce pressure when instructions are obeyed.

Quick penetration
Is designed for situations where the Operator(s) has or is losing control of a situation with touch pressure. By location a pressure point and repetitive strong strikes with the digital tip will result in stunning the subject on an average of three to seven seconds, allowing the Operator(s) to re-establish control with another technique.

Striking methods
This technique can be the most severe application of pressure point or nerve motor point techniques. Striking techniques are used to stop forward motion of an aggressor, so you can withdrawal or apply restraining accoutrements. Striking methods have been designed to create an instant stun (lasting three to seven seconds), caused by either a defensive counter measure or a strike from an impact weapon.

Fluid shock wave principle Due to the body consisting of approximately 90% water the fluid shock wave principle has its name derived. It is sometimes called the hit and stick method of striking. The strike is made to a nerve motor point, energy from the source into the target is known as kinetic energy. The amount of kinetic energy that dissipates into the nerve motor point will depend on the velocity, the mass of the energy source and the duration of the transfer. The efficiency of the strike will determine by the length of the motor dysfunction.

Note
- It is important that an Operator reduces pressure as soon as the subject complies as failure to do so may cause the Subject to increase resistance or become unconscious.
- Ensure to place yourself into safe position before releasing pain compliance techniques.
- During training caution should be exercised as prolonged application can cause bodily upset.

Pressure point – Mandibular Angle
Nerves affected: Hypoglossal, Vagus and Glossopharyngeal
Location: Where the three nerves come together at the base of the ear lobe, behind the Mandible.
Application: Touch pressure, quick penetration
Force category: Open hand
Direction of pressure: Towards the centre of the head, directed with a slight angle towards the nose.
Expected effects: medium to high level pain and cease intentional motor activity
Principles of application: To be utilised by applying the thumb (digital tip) with touch or quick penetration pressure. Stabilise the head with a head clamp technique.

Pressure point – Hypoglossal Nerve
Nerves affected: Hypoglossal
Location: The hypoglossal is located approximately 2.5 centimetres down the mandible from the mandibular angle, towards the chin, under the mandible.
Application: Touch pressure, quick penetration
Force category: Open hand
Direction of pressure: Pressure should be applied in an upward direction, under the mandible, towards the centre of the skull.
Expected effects of touch pressure: When this technique is applied in the correct method the subject will experience or display the following: - Medium to high intensity of pain - Immediate signs of submission - Weakening or interruption of all motor activity
Expected effects of quick penetration: When this technique is applied in the correct method the subject will experience or displays the following: - Immediate decrease in level of resistance - Mental stunning – lasting between 3 – 7 seconds
Principles of application: Distraction technique, pain compliance, balance displacement Application of this technique is best applied with the thumb supported by the first, or by using the middle two fingers unsupported. Use in conjunction with a head clamp technique to stabilise the head.

Pressure point – Brachial Plexus Tie-in
Nerves affected: Median, radial, and ulnar
Location: Located where the brachial plexus runs through the shoulder and arm. The motor point is at the junction of the pectoralis major, the bicep and the deltoid muscle.
Application: Striking technique – fluid shock wave
Force category: Open hand
Direction of pressure: Direct pressure to the point, stopping forward motion of the subject.
Expected effects: Medium level pain, motor dysfunction of the effected arm and hand, immediate sign of submission probable,
Principles of application: Developed, as a striking location to create motor dysfunction of the shoulder, arm and hand for disarming, delivered no less than three strikes with fluid shock wave striking principle to ensure motor dysfunction. Also used to immobilise the subject’s movement enabling the Operator(s) to adapt to an alternative technique. Applied with a palm heal striking technique

Pressure point – Brachial Plexus Origin
Nerves affected: Median, radial, ulnar
Location: Side of neck, approximately 1 2 centimetres from the base
Application: Touch pressure, quick penetration, striking technique
Force category: Open hand
Direction of pressure: Angled downward pressure to the base of the neck
Expected effects: Medium to high level pain, motor dysfunction to effected arm, neck, shoulder, mental stunning between 3 – 7 seconds
Principles of application: Either the palm heel or hammer fist of the Operator, to the side of the subject’s neck. A stun should never be delivered by a bony part of the hand or wrist or hand. With increased pressure to the point, it creates a sympathetic response to both of the legs.

Pressure point – Clavicle Notch
Nerves affected: Brachial, radial, ulnar
Location: Located directly behind the clavicle bone in a depression, which is approximately half way between the shoulder joint and sternum.
Application: Touch pressure, quick penetration
Force category: Open hand
Direction of pressure: Applied downward pressure at a 45 degree angle towards the body centre
Expected effects: High level pain, motor dysfunction of the arm, mental stunning between 3 – 7 seconds
Principles of application: This is best applied from behind the subject, assisted with a rear head clamp. Once found the Operator delivers pressure to the nerve by pressing down with the fingers towards the feet of the subject, creating a knee reflex to the subject causing him or her to sit.

Pressure point – Jugular Notch
Nerves affected: Superior laryngeal, recurrent laryngeal
Location: The trachea and small nerve fibres in the jugular notch region.
Application: Touch pressure, quick penetration
Force category: Open hand
Direction of pressure: Pressure is in a downward direct towards the centre of the body at a 45-degree angle from either or rear of the subject.
Expected effects of touch pressure: When this technique is applied in the correct manner the subject will experience or display the following: - Loss of balance and or over balancing - Involuntary reflex away from the source of pressure - Immediate change in the subjects thought process - Pressure applied creates a gagging affect, indirectly elevating the subject’s heart rate.
Expected effects of quick pressure: When this technique is applied in the correct manner the subject will experience or display the following: - Stop immediately all intentional motor activity - Shifting of subjects balance - Involuntary reflexing away from source of pressure - Low level mental stunning
Principles of application: Distraction technique, balance displacement This technique is useful tool when dealing with an uncooperative subject in a confined space.

Pressure point – Suprascapular Nerve
Nerves affected: Suprascapular
Location: The suprascapular never motor point is found at the junction where the trapezius muscle connects to the side of the neck.
Application: Striking technique
Force Category: Closed or open hand
Direction of pressure: The angle of the strike should be directed to the floor
Expected effects: When this technique is correctly applied the subject will experience or display the following: - High level of pain, - A temporary motor dysfunction to the affected arm and hand - Involuntary motor dysfunction flexing of the hand - Mental stunning lasting between 3 – 7 seconds - Subject may experience numbing of the affected hand and arm
Principles of application: Motor dysfunction The delivery of a strike to the suprascapular nerve motor point, delivered in the correct manner, will create a motor dysfunction to the subject’s shoulder and arm area. An extremely effective technique will create a motor reflex to the subject’s legs causing a leg collapse. Used when the subject is actively focusing on a prospective victim (applied from position three). Strikes can be delivered with either hammer fist or palm strike using a fluid shock wave technique.

Pressure point – Radial Nerve
Nerves affected: Radial nerve
Location: The radial nerve is approximately 50 mm below the elbow joint on top of the forearm.
Application: Striking technique
Force category: Closed hand
Direction of pressure: Toward the centre of the arm
Expected effects: When this technique is correctly applied the subject will experience or display the following: - Medium to high tensity of pain - Motor dysfunction to the affected arm - Flex – reflex response to the affected hand
Principles of application: Motor dysfunction, stunning Strikes should be delivered with a hammer fist using a fluid shock wave method of striking, designed to encourage grip release for disarming of a weapon.

Pressure point – Median Nerve
Nerves affected: Motor nerve of hand
Location: Inside of the forearm, approximately 30mm from the base of the wrist
Application: Striking technique
Force category: Closed hand
Direction of pressure: Toward the centre of the wrist
Expected effects: When this technique is correctly applied the subject will experience or display the following: - Medium to high pain - Muscular and motor function lasting between three to seven seconds
Principles of application: Motor and muscular dysfunction, stunning Strike delivered with a fluid shock wave strike with a hammer fist, palm strike or with a baton, designed to encourage grip release for disarming of a weapon.

Pressure point – Femoral Nerve
Nerves affected: Femoral nerve
Location: Located on the inside of the thigh, the nerve runs the length of the thigh the preferred target area is situated mid-way from the groin to the knee
Application: Touch pressure or striking
Force category: Open hand or baton strike
Direction of pressure: Inside of thigh, mid-way between the groin and knee
Expected effects: When the correct application of a strike or touch pressure is applied the subject will experience or display the following: - Strike – temporary paralysis of the affected leg - High level of pain - A mental stun lasting between 3 – 7 seconds
Principles of application: Motor dysfunction, stunning Creates a knee bend reflex of the affected leg Also used in ground control with knee pressure to create movement

Pressure point – Common Peroneal Nerve
Nerves affected: Common peroneal nerve
Location: Located on the outside of the thigh approximately at the lower centre of the thigh and about at fingertip position when the hand hangs relaxed by the side.
Application: Striking technique (knee strike)
Force category: Baton strike and striking technique (closed hand)
Direction of pressure: Impact should be directed towards the centre of leg mass
Expected effects: When the correct application of a strike is applied the subject will experience or display the following: - Temporary paralysis of the affected leg - Involuntary flex reflex response to the affected leg - High level of pain - A mental stun lasting between 3 – 7 seconds
Principles of application: Motor dysfunction, stunning Also used in ground control with knee pressure to create movement

Pressure point – Superficial Peroneal Nerve
Nerves affected: The superficial peroneal nerve
Location: Lower shin above ankle joint
Application: Striking technique (kicking)
Force category: Striking method (closed hand)
Direction of pressure: Downward kick, toward the subject’s heel
Expected effects: High level pain, mental stunning lasting between 3 – 7 seconds
Principles of application: Motor dysfunction, stunning Creates balance displacement and paralysis of the affected leg

Pressure point – Tibial Nerve - Motor Point
Nerves affected: Tibial nerve
Location: Located in the centre belly of the calf muscle
Application: Kicking technique (front kick) and touch pressure
Force category: Baton strike, striking method (closed hand) or open hand
Direction of pressure: Downward pressure to the centre of calf muscle
Expected effects: When the correct application of a strike or touch pressure is applied the subject will experience or display the following: - Strike – temporary paralysis of the affected leg - Involuntary reflex response in the unaffected lag - High level of pain - A mental stun lasting between 3 – 7 seconds
Principles of application: Motor dysfunction, stunning Also used in ground control with knee pressure to create movement

Home Control and Restraint


SenseiSam
SenseiSam
Latest page update: made by SenseiSam , Sep 27 2014, 11:56 AM EDT (about this update About This Update SenseiSam Edited by SenseiSam


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